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Nature. 2019 Oct;574(7776):45-56. doi: 10.1038/s41586-019-1593-5. Epub 2019 Oct 2.

Harnessing innate immunity in cancer therapy.

Author information

1
Innate Pharma, Marseille, France.
2
Aix Marseille Université, INSERM, CNRS, Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, Marseille, France.
3
Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
4
Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
5
Innate Pharma, Marseille, France. vivier@ciml.univ-mrs.fr.
6
Aix Marseille Université, INSERM, CNRS, Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, Marseille, France. vivier@ciml.univ-mrs.fr.
7
Service d'Immunologie, Marseille Immunopole, Hôpital de la Timone, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Marseille, Marseille, France. vivier@ciml.univ-mrs.fr.

Abstract

New therapies that promote antitumour immunity have been recently developed. Most of these immunomodulatory approaches have focused on enhancing T-cell responses, either by targeting inhibitory pathways with immune checkpoint inhibitors, or by targeting activating pathways, as with chimeric antigen receptor T cells or bispecific antibodies. Although these therapies have led to unprecedented successes, only a minority of patients with cancer benefit from these treatments, highlighting the need to identify new cells and molecules that could be exploited in the next generation of immunotherapy. Given the crucial role of innate immune responses in immunity, harnessing these responses opens up new possibilities for long-lasting, multilayered tumour control.

PMID:
31578484
DOI:
10.1038/s41586-019-1593-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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