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Harefuah. 2019 Oct;158(10):630-634.

[INTERVENTIONS TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF THE INTERNSHIP YEAR].

[Article in Hebrew]

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine C, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, affiliated with the Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.
2
Division of Internal Medicine, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, affiliated with the Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.
3
Department of Anesthesiology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, affiliated with the Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.
4
Internship Committee of Shaare Zedek Medical Center, affiliated with the Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.

Abstract

AIMS:

To describe three interventions that have improved the quality of the internship.

BACKGROUND:

All medical school graduates are required to take a one year internship, rotating through various hospital departments. By various objective and subjective measures, the quality, benefit and efficacy of the internship varies significantly between departments and hospitals and also depends on where the interns studied.

METHODS:

The interventions were: First, all graduates of foreign medical schools (FMG) were required to interview and present a patient, demonstrating practical knowledge of spoken and written Hebrew and basic medical terminology prior to the start of the internship. Second, on the first day of their internship in internal medicine the new interns participate in an orientation day, addressing multiple clinical, administrative and other components. Third, upon the completion of their rotation in internal medicine, the interns participate in an interactive session to help them prepare for their future career.

RESULTS:

First, during the first 3 years after introducing the Hebrew test, 101 FMGs took the test, 89 (88%) passed the first time, the remainder passed the 2nd or 3rd test after another 1-3 months of studying Hebrew. Of 31 women, 30 (97%) passed the first time, compared to 59/70 (84%) of the men (p=0.065); 27/28 (96%) of Jewish interns passed the first time compared to 62/73 (85%) non-Jewish interns (p=0.99). Physicians report on the significantly increased ability of FMGs to participate in all activities from the onset of their internship. Second, upon completion of the orientation, 137 interns provided feedback of its 12 components; satisfaction was marked on a Likert scale (ranging from 1 [low] to 5 [high]) and ranged from 4.2±0.1 to 4.7±0.6; high/very high satisfaction with the various components ranged from 79% to 96%. Third, feedback was provided by 96 interns after participating in the interactive session helping to prepare for the future; satisfaction with the 5 components of the session ranged from 3.8±0.8 (on the acquired insight into the possibilities, scope and limitations regarding their future career) to 4.5±0.7 (regarding the relevance of such sessions). Sub-analysis revealed several statistically significant differences between male and female interns (male interns indicated these sessions to be more important to them than females, p<0.01), and FMG (as compared to graduates from Israeli medical schools) indicated that they had acquired relevant information more often (p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Various interventions positively impact the quality, benefit and efficacy of the internship as observed by physicians working with the residents, as well as perceived by the interns themselves.

PMID:
31576706
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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