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Med Vet Entomol. 2019 Sep 30. doi: 10.1111/mve.12408. [Epub ahead of print]

Discovery of an Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus population and first records of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti in Canada.

Author information

1
Centre for Vector-Borne Diseases, Brock University, St Catharines, Canada.
2
Centre for Biotechnology, Brock University, St Catharines, Canada.
3
Entomogen Inc., St Catharines, Canada.
4
Department of Biological Sciences, Brock University, St Catharines, Canada.
5
Enteric, Zoonotic and Vector-Borne Diseases Unit, Public Health Ontario, Toronto, Canada.

Abstract

A population of Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae), a vector of chikungunya, dengue, yellow fever, and Zika and West Nile viruses, has been detected in Windsor, Ontario, Canada from 2016 onwards. Here, we describe its seasonal distribution, as well as the various aquatic habitats from which this species was collected and its larval co-habitation. We collected immatures from tires, treeholes, extruded polystyrene foam containers, discarded plastic cups, old recycling bins and oviposition traps. Aedes albopictus larvae were collected with Aedes japonicus (Theobald), Anopheles punctipennis (Say), Culex pipiens Linnaeus, Ochlerotatus hendersoni (Cockerell), Ochlerotatus triseriatus (Say) and Orthopodomyia signifera (Coquillett). Adult female and male specimens were collected from Biogents sentinel traps (Biogents AG, Regensburg, Germany), as well as Centers for Disease Control and Prevention miniature light traps (CDC, Atlanta, GA, U.S.A.), and also as they alighted on the investigators. Peak adult collections occurred in September during epidemiological week 37. We also collected Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (Linnaeus), a new record for Canada, in 2016 and from two new collection sites in 2017. The 2017 collections were 3.5 km north and 19.4 km south of the index site. The present study adds to the increasing number of studies reporting range expansions of these mosquito species.

KEYWORDS:

Aedes aegypti; Aedes albopictus; invasive species; new record; range expansion; vector

PMID:
31566765
DOI:
10.1111/mve.12408

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