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Nat Commun. 2019 Sep 27;10(1):4406. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-12111-x.

The fecal resistome of dairy cattle is associated with diet during nursing.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science and Technology, Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA, 95616, USA.
2
Foods for Health Institute, University of California, Davis, California, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA, 95616, USA.
3
USDA ARS Western Human Nutrition Research Center, 430 West Health Sciences Dr., Davis, CA, 95616, USA.
4
Genome Center, University of California, 451 Health Science Dr., Davis, CA, 95616, USA.
5
Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, California, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.
6
Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis, California, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.
7
Department of Food Science and Technology, Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA, 95616, USA. damills@ucdavis.edu.
8
Foods for Health Institute, University of California, Davis, California, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA, 95616, USA. damills@ucdavis.edu.
9
Department of Viticulture and Enology, Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science, University of California, Davis, California, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA, 95616, USA. damills@ucdavis.edu.

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance is a global public health concern, and livestock play a significant role in selecting for resistance and maintaining such reservoirs. Here we study the succession of dairy cattle resistome during early life using metagenomic sequencing, as well as the relationship between resistome, gut microbiota, and diet. In our dataset, the gut of dairy calves serves as a reservoir of 329 antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) presumably conferring resistance to 17 classes of antibiotics, and the abundance of ARGs declines gradually during nursing. ARGs appear to co-occur with antibacterial biocide or metal resistance genes. Colostrum is a potential source of ARGs observed in calves at day 2. The dynamic changes in the resistome are likely a result of gut microbiota assembly, which is closely associated with diet transition in dairy calves. Modifications in the resistome may be possible via early-life dietary interventions to reduce overall antimicrobial resistance.

PMID:
31562300
PMCID:
PMC6765000
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-019-12111-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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