Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Brain Struct Funct. 2019 Sep 27. doi: 10.1007/s00429-019-01958-x. [Epub ahead of print]

A dimensional approach to jealousy reveals enhanced fronto-striatal, insula and limbic responses to angry faces.

Author information

1
The Clinical Hospital of Chengdu Brain Science Institute, MOE Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, No.2006, Xiyuan Ave., West Hi-Tech Zone, Chengdu, 611731, Sichuan, China.
2
The Clinical Hospital of Chengdu Brain Science Institute, MOE Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, No.2006, Xiyuan Ave., West Hi-Tech Zone, Chengdu, 611731, Sichuan, China. ben_becker@gmx.de.
3
The Clinical Hospital of Chengdu Brain Science Institute, MOE Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, No.2006, Xiyuan Ave., West Hi-Tech Zone, Chengdu, 611731, Sichuan, China. k.kendrick.uestc@gmail.com.

Abstract

Jealousy is a complex social emotion combining the different primary emotions of anger, fear and sadness. Previous evidence has suggested the involvement of fronto-striatal dopaminergic circuitry in pathological jealousy, although little is known about overlaps with the neural representation of primary emotions involved in non-morbid jealousy and the utility of a dimensional neuroimaging approach. In the current study, 85 healthy subjects underwent fMRI during an emotional face recognition paradigm and resting state. A total of 150 faces (happy, angry, fearful, sad, neutral) were presented and subjects required to identify the expression and rate its intensity. Trait jealousy was assessed using the Multidimensional Jealousy Scale. Behavioral results showed that only intensity ratings of angry faces were positively associated with subjects' jealousy scores. During processing of angry versus neutral expression faces, subjects with elevated jealousy exhibited increased activation in the right thalamus, insula, fusiform gyrus and hippocampus, left dorsal striatum, superior parietal lobule and bilateral cerebellum and inferior frontal gyrus after controlling for trait aggression and sex. Functional connectivity between the inferior frontal gyrus and dorsal striatum was also increased. No associations with resting-state functional connectivity were found. Overall, the present study demonstrates an association between exaggerated jealousy and increased intensity ratings of angry faces as well as activity and functional connectivity of the dorsal striatal-inferior frontal circuitry. Thus, increased emotional responsivity to social threat and enhanced activity in limbic regions and dopaminergic fronto-striatal circuitry may be features of both non-morbid and pathological jealousy confirming the utility of a dimensional approach.

KEYWORDS:

Anger; Dimensional approach; Face emotion; Fronto-striatal circuits; Jealousy; Limbic system

PMID:
31560099
DOI:
10.1007/s00429-019-01958-x

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center