Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Syst. 2019 Sep 25;9(3):221-227. doi: 10.1016/j.cels.2019.08.001.

Simple Rules Determine Distinct Patterns of Branching Morphogenesis.

Author information

1
Departments of Anatomy, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Cell and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
2
Center for Cellular Construction, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
3
Departments of Anatomy, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Department of Pediatrics (Cardiology), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics (Nephrology), University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
5
Cell and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
6
Cell and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Center for Cellular Construction, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
7
Departments of Anatomy, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Center for Cellular Construction, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic address: keith.mostov@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

Many metazoan organs are comprised of branching trees of epithelial tubes; how patterning occurs in these trees is a fundamental problem of development. Commonly, branch tips fill the volume of the organ approximately uniformly, e.g., in mammalian lung, airway branch tips are dispersed roughly uniformly throughout the volume of the lung. In contrast, in the developing metanephric kidney, the tips of the ureteric bud tree are located close to the outer surface of the kidney rather than filling the kidney. Here, we describe a simple alteration in the branching rules that accounts for the difference between the kidney pattern that leads to tips near the organ surface versus previously known patterns that lead to the branch tips being dispersed throughout the organ. We further use a simple toy model to deduce from first principles how this rule change accounts for the differences in the two types of trees.

PMID:
31557453
DOI:
10.1016/j.cels.2019.08.001

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center