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Nat Commun. 2019 Sep 24;10(1):4330. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-12026-7.

The transferability of lipid loci across African, Asian and European cohorts.

Author information

1
Division of Psychiatry, University College of London, London, W1T 7NF, UK. k.kuchenbaecker@ucl.ac.uk.
2
UCL Genetics Institute, University College London, London, WC1E 6BT, UK. k.kuchenbaecker@ucl.ac.uk.
3
Department of Human Genetics, Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, CB10 1SA, UK. k.kuchenbaecker@ucl.ac.uk.
4
Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, London, WC1E 6BT, UK.
5
Department of Human Genetics, Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, CB10 1SA, UK.
6
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB1 8RN, UK.
7
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland.
8
University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
9
Medical Research Council Population Health Research Unit (MRC PHRU), Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
10
Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit (CTSU), Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
11
Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, King's College London, London, SE1 9RT, UK.
12
Institute of Translational Genomics, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany.
13
Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7BN, UK.
14
Anogia Medical Centre, Anogia, 740 51, Greece.
15
Echinos Medical Centre, Echinos, Xanthi, 67300, Greece.
16
Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, WC1E 7HT, UK.
17
Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, WC1E 7HT, UK.
18
Medical Research1 Council/Uganda Virus Research Institute and London School of Hygiene (MRC/UVRI and LSHTM), Uganda Research Unit, Entebbe, Uganda.
19
African Population and Health Research Center, Nairobi, Kenya.
20
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
21
Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100730, China.
22
Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex, UK.
23
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
24
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, 100191, China.
25
Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ, UK.

Abstract

Most genome-wide association studies are based on samples of European descent. We assess whether the genetic determinants of blood lipids, a major cardiovascular risk factor, are shared across populations. Genetic correlations for lipids between European-ancestry and Asian cohorts are not significantly different from 1. A genetic risk score based on LDL-cholesterol-associated loci has consistent effects on serum levels in samples from the UK, Uganda and Greece (r = 0.23-0.28, p < 1.9 × 10-14). Overall, there is evidence of reproducibility for ~75% of the major lipid loci from European discovery studies, except triglyceride loci in the Ugandan samples (10% of loci). Individual transferable loci are identified using trans-ethnic colocalization. Ten of fourteen loci not transferable to the Ugandan population have pleiotropic associations with BMI in Europeans; none of the transferable loci do. The non-transferable loci might affect lipids by modifying food intake in environments rich in certain nutrients, which suggests a potential role for gene-environment interactions.

PMID:
31551420
PMCID:
PMC6760173
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-019-12026-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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