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Nat Microbiol. 2019 Dec;4(12):2090-2100. doi: 10.1038/s41564-019-0532-4. Epub 2019 Sep 23.

A genomic view of the reef-building coral Porites lutea and its microbial symbionts.

Author information

1
Australian Centre for Ecogenomics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
2
Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
3
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
4
Division of Ecology & Evolution, Research School of Biology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.
5
Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville, Queensland, Australia.
6
Department of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, USA.
7
Department of Cellular, Molecular, and Biomedical Sciences, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, USA.
8
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia.
9
Red Sea Research Center, Division of Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia.
10
Department of Biology, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany.
11
Australian Centre for Ecogenomics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. g.tyson@uq.edu.au.
12
College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

Corals and the reef ecosystems that they support are in global decline due to increasing anthropogenic pressures such as climate change1. However, effective reef conservation strategies are hampered by a limited mechanistic understanding of coral biology and the functional roles of the diverse microbial communities that underpin coral health2,3. Here, we present an integrated genomic characterization of the coral species Porites lutea and its microbial partners. High-quality genomes were recovered from P. lutea, as well as a metagenome-assembled Cladocopium C15 (the dinoflagellate symbiont) and 52 bacterial and archaeal populations. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that many of the bacterial and archaeal genomes encode motifs that may be involved in maintaining association with the coral host and in supplying fixed carbon, B-vitamins and amino acids to their eukaryotic partners. Furthermore, mechanisms for ammonia, urea, nitrate, dimethylsulfoniopropionate and taurine transformation were identified that interlink members of the holobiont and may be important for nutrient acquisition and retention in oligotrophic waters. Our findings demonstrate the critical and diverse roles that microorganisms play within the coral holobiont and underscore the need to consider all of the components of the holobiont if we are to effectively inform reef conservation strategies.

PMID:
31548681
DOI:
10.1038/s41564-019-0532-4

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