Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes Care. 2019 Sep 23. pii: dc190855. doi: 10.2337/dc19-0855. [Epub ahead of print]

One Year Clinical Experience of the First Commercial Hybrid Closed-Loop.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA inforay@stanford.edu.
2
Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.
3
Stanford Diabetes Research Center, Stanford, CA.
4
Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In September 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the Medtronic 670G "hybrid" closed-loop system. In Auto Mode, this system automatically controls basal insulin delivery based on continuous glucose monitoring data, but requires users enter carbohydrates and blood glucose for boluses. To track real-world experience with this first commercial closed-loop device, we prospectively followed pediatric and adult patients starting the 670G system.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

This was a 1-year prospective observational study of patients with type 1 diabetes starting the 670G system between May 2017 and May 2018 in clinic.

RESULTS:

A total of 84 patients received 670G and consented, 5 never returned for follow-up, with 79 (aged 9-61 years) providing data at 1 week and 3, 6, 9, and/or 12 months after Auto Mode initiation. For the 86% (68 out of 79) with 1-week data, 99% (67 out of 68) successfully started. By 3 months, at least 28% (22 out of 79) stopped using Auto Mode; at 6 months, 34% (27 out of 79); at 9 months, 35% (28 out of 79); and by 12 months, 33% (26 out of 79). The primary reason for continuing Auto Mode was desire for increased time in range. Reasons for discontinuation included sensor issues in 62% (16 out of 26), problems obtaining supplies in 12% (3 out of 26), hypoglycemia fear in 12% (3 out of 26), multiple daily injection preference in 8% (2 out of 26), and sports in 8% (2 out of 26). At all visits, there was a significant correlation between hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and Auto Mode utilization.

CONCLUSIONS:

While Auto Mode utilization correlates with improved glycemic control, a focus on usability and human factors is necessary to ensure use of Auto Mode. Alarms and sensor calibration are a major patient concern, which future technology should alleviate.

PMID:
31548247
DOI:
10.2337/dc19-0855

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center