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Maturitas. 2019 Nov;129:6-11. doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2019.08.002. Epub 2019 Aug 10.

Associations of parental ages at childbirth with healthy aging among women.

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive #0725, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Electronic address: aladdinhs@yahoo.com.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 900 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
3
Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 N Lake Ave, Worcester, MA 01655, USA.
4
North American Menopause Society Emeritus, 30100 Chagrin Blvd, Pepper Pike, OH 44124, USA.
5
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Nevada School of Medicine, 1664 North Virginia Street, Reno, NV 89557, USA.
6
Division of Population Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University, 1590 N High St, Columbus, OH 43201, USA.
7
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA.
8
MedStar Health Research Institute and Georgetown-Howard Universities Center for Clinical and Translational Science, 6525 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.
9
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive #0725, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine associations of parental ages at childbirth with healthy survival to age 90 years among older women.

STUDY DESIGN:

This study included a racially and ethnically diverse sub-cohort of 8,983 postmenopausal women from the larger Women's Health Initiative population, recruited during 1993-1998 and followed for up to 25 years through 2018.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The outcome was categorized as: 1) healthy survival, defined as survival to age 90 without major morbidities (coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, or hip fracture) or mobility disability; 2) usual survival, defined as survival to age 90 without healthy aging (reference category); or 3) death before age 90. Women reported their own and their parents' birth years, and parental ages at childbirth were calculated and categorized as <25, 25-29, 30-34, or ≥35 years.

RESULTS:

Women were aged on average 71.3 (standard deviation 2.7; range 65-79) years at baseline. There was no significant association of maternal age at childbirth with healthy survival to age 90 or death before age 90. Women born to fathers aged ≥35 compared with 30-34 years at their births were more likely to achieve healthy than usual survival (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.00-1.32). There was no association of paternal age at childbirth with death before age 90.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings suggest that being born to older fathers was associated with healthy survival to age 90 among women who had survived to ages 65-79 years at study baseline. There was no association of maternal age at childbirth with healthy survival to age 90 among these older women.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Childbirth; Longevity; Maternal age; Paternal age; Women

PMID:
31547915
PMCID:
PMC6761991
[Available on 2020-11-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.maturitas.2019.08.002

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