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Clin Transplant. 2019 Oct;33(10):e13719. doi: 10.1111/ctr.13719. Epub 2019 Oct 11.

Continuous glucose monitoring to assess glycemic control in the first 6 weeks after pancreas transplantation.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
2
Department of Transplant Surgery, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota.
3
Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Current therapy for Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by significant glucose variability (GV). Pancreas transplantation (PT) is performed in certain T1D patients with and without end-stage renal disease. To date, GV has been examined to a limited extent after PT.

METHODS:

We investigated GV using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) 3-6 weeks after PT.

RESULTS:

Eleven patients had simultaneous kidney pancreas transplantation (SPK), nine pancreas after kidney (PAK), and six pancreas transplantation alone (PTA). Mean CGM showed no difference between SPK, 126.5 ± 13.9, PAK 119.9 ± 12.8, and PTA 131.1 ± 29 mg/dL (P value .6). Percentage of time in range (TIR, 70-180 mg/dL) was 92% for SPK, 93.4% in PAK, and 88.5% in PTA with only 0.3%, 1.5%, and 0.3% of time <70 mg/dL. Percentage >180 mg/dL was 7.9% for SPK, 4.9% PAK, and 11% in PTA. Other measures of GV were similar in the three cohorts. In six patients, CGM was performed before and after PT and improved significantly. GV was also better compared with a matched cohort of T1D patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

All 3 types of PT resulted in excellent glucose control 3-6 weeks post-procedure. CGM outcomes represent an important objective outcome after PT.

KEYWORDS:

Type 1 diabetes; continuous glucose monitor; glycemic variability; hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia; pancreas transplantation

PMID:
31545535
DOI:
10.1111/ctr.13719

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