Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Oral Dis. 2019 Sep 21. doi: 10.1111/odi.13201. [Epub ahead of print]

Can Oral Health and Oral-derived Biospecimens Predict Progression of Dementia?

Orr ME1,2,3,4,5, Reveles KR6,7, Yeh CK1,2,8, Young EH6,7, Han X1,3.

Author information

1
Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, UT Health San Antonio, San Antonio, TX.
2
Geriatric Research, Education & Clinical Center and Research Service, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, TX.
3
Department of Medicine, UT Health San Antonio, San Antonio, TX.
4
Biggs Institute for Alzheimer's and Neurodegenerative Diseases, UT Health San Antonio, San Antonio, TX.
5
Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Sticht Center for Healthy Aging and Alzheimer's Prevention, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.
6
College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.
7
Pharmacotherapy Education & Research Center, UT Health San Antonio, San Antonio, TX.
8
Comprehensive Dentistry, School of Dentistry, UT Health San Antonio, San Antonio, TX.

Abstract

Growing evidence indicates that oral health and brain health are interconnected. Declining cognition and dementia coincide with lack of self-preservation, including oral hygiene. The oral microbiota plays an important role in maintaining oral health. Emerging evidence suggests a link between oral dysbiosis and cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease. This review showcases the recent advances connecting oral health and cognitive function during aging and the potential utility of oral-derived biospecimens to inform on brain health. Collectively, experimental findings indicate that the connection between oral health and cognition cannot be underestimated; moreover, oral biospecimens are abundant and readily obtainable without invasive procedures, which may help inform on cognitive health.

PMID:
31541581
DOI:
10.1111/odi.13201

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center