Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Sep 18;16(18). pii: E3477. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16183477.

Occupational Class Differences in Long-Term Sickness Absence Due to Breast Cancer during 2005-2013: A Population-Based Study among Finnish Women.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. johanna.suur-uski@helsinki.fi.
2
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. johanna.pekkala@helsinki.fi.
3
The Social Insurance Institution of Finland, FIN-00100 Helsinki, Finland. jenni.blomgren@kela.fi.
4
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. olli.k.pietilainen@helsinki.fi.
5
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. ossi.rahkonen@helsinki.fi.
6
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. minna.manty@helsinki.fi.
7
Department of Research, Development and InnovationLaurea University of Applied Sciences, City of Vantaa, FIN 01200 Vantaa, Finland. minna.manty@helsinki.fi.

Abstract

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Western countries with clear socioeconomic differences. Higher occupational class is associated with higher breast cancer incidence but with better survival from the disease, whereas lower occupational class is associated with higher risk of sickness absence. We are not aware of previous studies examining changes over time in occupational class differences in sickness absence due to breast cancer. This paper focuses on occupational class differences in the incidence and duration of sickness absence due to breast cancer over the period of 2005-2013. Age-adjusted occupational class differences in the cumulative incidence and duration of sickness absence due to breast cancer were calculated utilising a nationally representative 70% random sample of employed Finnish women aged 35-64 years (yearly N varying between 499,778 and 519,318). The results show that higher occupational class was associated with higher annual cumulative incidence of sickness absence due to breast cancer. Lower occupational class was associated with longer duration of absence. Occupational class differences in both cumulative incidence and duration of absence remained broadly stable. As a conclusion, these results suggest that measures should be targeted particularly to promotion of work capacity among employees with breast cancer in lower occupational classes.

KEYWORDS:

breast cancer; occupational class differences; sickness absence; trend

PMID:
31540506
PMCID:
PMC6766186
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph16183477
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center