Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Contemp Clin Trials Commun. 2019 Sep 8;16:100447. doi: 10.1016/j.conctc.2019.100447. eCollection 2019 Dec.

Shared decision making in IBD: A novel approach to trial consent and timing.

Author information

1
Division of Hospital Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
2
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
3
James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
4
Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
5
Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
6
Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

Abstract

Background:

Shared decision making (SDM) between families and physicians may facilitate informed, timely decisions to proceed with biologic therapy in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our team previously developed an SDM tool to aid communication between physicians and families when considering biologic therapy for children with IBD.

Objective:

We are conducting a prospective, pre-post pilot trial of a new SDM tool. The primary aim of the study is to assess feasibility of both the intervention and trial procedures for a future large-scale trial.

Methods:

We are enrolling physicians with experience prescribing biologic therapy in the past year and families of children with IBD. Families in the intervention arm receive a 3-step intervention including a letter sent before trial consent or clinic appointment, an in-clinic decision tool and a follow-up phone call. Our primary trial outcome is a measure of feasibility, with measures of clinical and decision outcomes secondary. We seek to enroll 27 families in each of 2 arms (usual-care and intervention) and plan data collection at the time of the initial visit or hospital stay, and at 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months after the initial visit.

Conclusion:

This study protocol is designed to demonstrate that integrating novel consent procedures, including timing and multiple versions of written consent, may increase trial feasibility while maintaining scientific rigor and full protection of study participants.

KEYWORDS:

Consent; Inflammatory bowel disease; Pediatrics; Pilot trials

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center