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Qual Life Res. 2019 Sep 18. doi: 10.1007/s11136-019-02298-3. [Epub ahead of print]

Differential associations between interpersonal variables and quality-of-life in a sample of college students.

Author information

1
University of Washington, 119a Guthrie Hall, Box 351525, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. adamkucz@uw.edu.
2
University of Washington, 119a Guthrie Hall, Box 351525, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1 Bowdoin Square, Room 656, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Humans are fundamentally social beings, and the relationships we form with others are crucial for our well-being. Research across a variety of domains has established the association between a variety of interpersonal factors and health outcomes, including quality-of-life. However, there is a need for a more integrative, holistic analysis of these variables and how they relate to one another.

METHODS:

Undergraduate students (nā€‰=ā€‰1456) from four universities across the United States completed self-report measures of their quality-of-life and a variety of interpersonal factors identified as important predictors across the literature. We examined zero-order correlations between these measures and quality-of-life, estimated a path model to look at unique variance accounted for by each, and finally used network analysis to examine the network of direct and indirect associations among these variables and quality-of-life.

RESULTS:

Loneliness had the strongest association with quality-of-life across all analyses. When examining the unique association between quality-of-life and each interpersonal variable, six remained statistically significant: loneliness, social support, social connectedness, emotional intelligence, intimacy with one's romantic partner, and empathic concern. These results were supported by the network model, which found direct associations between quality-of-life and these six variables as well as indirect associations with all other interpersonal variables in the model.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results from this research suggest that interpersonal factors in general, and loneliness in particular, are strongly associated with quality-of-life. Future research is needed to establish the direction of these effects and examine for whom these findings are generalizable.

KEYWORDS:

Interpersonal processes; Loneliness; Network analysis; Quality-of-life; Social isolation

PMID:
31535262
DOI:
10.1007/s11136-019-02298-3

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