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Odontology. 2019 Sep 17. doi: 10.1007/s10266-019-00458-y. [Epub ahead of print]

A pilot study to assess oral colonization and pH buffering by the probiotic Streptococcus dentisani under different dosing regimes.

Author information

1
Center for Advanced Research in Public Health, FISABIO Foundation, Valencia, Spain.
2
CIBER Center for Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain.
3
Lluis Alcanyis Foundation Dental Clinic, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
4
AB-Biotics S.A, Sant Cugat del Valles, Barcelona, Spain.
5
Center for Advanced Research in Public Health, FISABIO Foundation, Valencia, Spain. mira_ale@gva.es.
6
CIBER Center for Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain. mira_ale@gva.es.

Abstract

Bacterial colonization in the oral cavity is critical for efficient action of probiotics. However, limited colonization rates have been reported in many clinical trials. The aim of this pilot clinical study was to evaluate the colonization efficiency of Streptococcus dentisani under different dosing schedules and pre-treatment conditions. Eleven adult volunteers enrolled in the study. A professional ultrasound cleaning was performed in quadrants 1 and 4. The probiotic was applied in all four quadrants at a total dose of 1010 CFUs, administered in a buccoadhesive gel for 5 min, either in a single dose (n = 5) or daily for a week (n = 6). Dental plaque and saliva samples were collected at baseline and after 14 and 28 days of first application. Amounts of S. dentisani and the cariogenic organism Streptococcus mutans were measured by qPCR and salivary pH was measured by reflectometry. There was a significant increase in S. dentisani cells at day 14 but not at day 28 under both dosing schedules. A non-significant higher colonization was found in the half-mouth with previous professional cleaning as compared to the intact half. There was a significant increase in salivary pH at day 14 (p = 0.024) and day 28 (p = 0.014), which was stronger in multi-dose patients, and a significant decrease in S. mutans at day 28 (p < 0.01). The results indicate that S. dentisani is transiently able to colonize the oral cavity and that it buffers oral pH, especially after multiple dosing. Future randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials should evaluate its use to prevent tooth decay.

KEYWORDS:

Dental caries; Lactic acid; Probiotic; Streptococcus dentisani; pH

PMID:
31531771
DOI:
10.1007/s10266-019-00458-y

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