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J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2019 Sep 13. doi: 10.1007/s40615-019-00631-7. [Epub ahead of print]

Successfully Recruiting Black and Hispanic/Latino Adolescents for Sexually Transmitted Infection and HIV Prevention Research.

Author information

1
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, MS E-45, Atlanta, GA, 30329, USA. dr.erinbradley@gmail.com.
2
New York University Rory Meyers College of Nursing, 433 First Ave, Room 406, New York, NY, 10003, USA.
3
Department of Health Promotion and Physical Education, Kennesaw State University, 290 Kennesaw State University Road, MD 0301, Kennesaw, GA, 30144, USA.
4
Department of Family and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, 418 Curie Blvd., Room 419, Philadelphia, PA, 19104-4217, USA.
5
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, MS E-45, Atlanta, GA, 30329, USA.
6
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Morehouse School of Medicine, 720 Westview Dr, Atlanta, GA, 30310, USA.

Abstract

Disparities in rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV between Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino adolescents and their white counterparts are well documented. Researchers may encounter notable challenges recruiting Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino adolescents for sexual risk reduction studies. In this article, we present information to assist with planning, implementing, and evaluating recruitment and retention strategies. We also provide practical examples of challenges and solutions from three STI/HIV epidemiologic or prevention intervention studies with different study purposes and populations. Researchers can use this information to aid proposal development, create or refine a recruitment/retention protocol before implementation, and troubleshoot challenges during implementation.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent research; Black/African American; HIV/AIDS; Hispanic/Latino; Recruit; Sexually transmitted infections

PMID:
31520322
DOI:
10.1007/s40615-019-00631-7

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