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J Robot Surg. 2019 Sep 13. doi: 10.1007/s11701-019-01025-x. [Epub ahead of print]

Two-year clinical outcomes associated with robotic-assisted subthalamic lead implantation in patients with Parkinson's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, 200 S. Manchester Avenue, Suite 210, Irvine, Orange, CA, 92868, USA.
2
Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, 200 S. Manchester Avenue, Suite 210, Irvine, Orange, CA, 92868, USA. alice.shihyu.wang@gmail.com.
3
Department of Neurology, University of California, 200 S. Manchester Avenue, Suite 206, Irvine, Orange, CA, 92868, USA.

Abstract

Few centers have routinely implemented robotic stereotactic systems for deep brain stimulator (DBS) placement. The present study compares clinical outcomes associated with robotic-assisted subthalamic nucleus (STN)-targeted DBS surgery in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) to those of the traditional frame-based method. A retrospective chart review was performed (February 2013-June 2017). Thirty-three patients were implanted using the Cosman-Roberts-Wells (CRW) frame and 27 patients were implanted using the ROSA robot. Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) or UPDRS part III motor scores and levodopa equivalent daily doses (LEDD) were examined preoperatively and at 6, 12, and 24 months of follow-up. Operative times and complication rates were recorded. For the frame-based group, the reduction in the mean MDS-UPDRS part III motor score compared to baseline was 27% both at 6 and 12 months, and 36.7% at 24 months. For the robotic-assisted group, the reduction in the mean motor score from baseline was 17.6% at 6 months, 19% at 12 months and 21.4% at 24 months. The mean LEDD for the frame-based group decreased by 48.7% at 6 months, 56.7% at 12 months, and 29.7% at 24 months. For the robotic-assisted group, the mean LEDD decreased by 42% at 6 months, 45% at 12 months and 50% at 24 months. There were no significant differences in the mean motor scores and the LEDD reduction between the two groups. Operative times tended to be longer for robotic-assisted DBS surgery. Clinical outcomes associated with robotic-assisted surgery are comparable to those with frame-based surgery.

KEYWORDS:

Deep brain stimulation; Movement disorders; Parkinson’s disease; STN-targeted DBS; Stereotactic neurosurgery; Surgical robotics

PMID:
31520275
DOI:
10.1007/s11701-019-01025-x

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