Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMJ Open. 2019 Sep 12;9(9):e031692. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-031692.

Does diabetes influence the probability of experiencing chronic low back pain? A population-based cohort study: the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study.

Author information

1
Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Department of Research, Innovation and Education, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway ingrid.heuch@ous-hf.no.
2
Department of Mathematics, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
3
Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
4
Norwegian Advisory Unit on Headaches, St Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
5
Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, HUNT Research Centre, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
6
Department of Endocrinology, St Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
7
Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Department of Research, Innovation and Education, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
8
Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Low back pain (LBP) is a major problem in modern society and it is important to study possible risk factors for this disorder. People with diabetes are often affected by LBP, but whether diabetes represents a risk factor for LBP has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to explore the association between diabetes and subsequent risk of chronic LBP.

DESIGN:

An 11-year follow-up study.

SETTING:

The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT2; 1995-1997) and HUNT3 (2006-2008) surveys of Nord-Trøndelag County in Norway.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Chronic LBP, defined as LBP persisting at least 3 months continuously during the last year.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 18 972 persons without chronic LBP at baseline in HUNT2, and 6802 persons who reported chronic LBP at baseline in HUNT2.

METHODS:

Associations between diabetes and risk of chronic LBP among individuals aged 30-69 years were examined by generalised linear modelling.

RESULTS:

Men without chronic LBP at baseline showed a significant association between diabetes and risk of chronic LBP (relative risk (RR) 1.43, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.96, p=0.043). In women, no association was found (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.48, p=0.98). No association could be established between diabetes and recurrence or persistence of chronic LBP after 11 years in either sex.

CONCLUSIONS:

Men with a diagnosis of diabetes may have a higher risk of subsequently experiencing chronic LBP.

KEYWORDS:

HUNT; cohort; diabetes; low back pain; musculoskeletal disorder

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central Icon for Norwegian BIBSYS system
Loading ...
Support Center