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Eur J Pain. 2020 Jan;24(1):39-50. doi: 10.1002/ejp.1482. Epub 2019 Oct 13.

Incidence of shoulder pain in 40 years old and over and associated factors: A systematic review.

Author information

1
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Université Laval Québec, Québec, QC, Canada.
2
Axe Santé des populations et pratiques optimales en santé, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Hôpital du Saint-Sacrement, Québec, QC, Canada.
3
Centre d'excellence sur le vieillissement de Québec (CEVQ), Hôpital du Saint-Sacrement, Québec, QC, Canada.
4
Population Health and Practice-Changing Research Group, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada.
5
Health and Social Services Systems, Knowledge Translation and Implementation component of the Québec SPOR-SUPPORT Unit, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada.
6
Department of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Shoulder pain is one of the most frequent musculoskeletal complaints, and its prevalence and consequences increase with age. However, little is known about the incidence of shoulder pain among aging adults. We conducted this review to estimate the incidence of shoulder pain in ageing adults and its associated factors.

DATABASES AND DATA TREATMENT:

We conducted a systematic review of cohort studies in which the incidence of shoulder pain and associated factors were explored in adults aged 40 years and over. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases were consulted.

RESULTS:

We retrieved 3332 studies and included six, of which five were prospective cohort studies and one was retrospective. For adults aged 45-64 years, the annual cumulative incidence was 2.4%. The incidence density was estimated at 17.3 per 1,000 person-years for adults in the 45-64 years age group, at 12.8 per 1000 person-years for those in the 65-74 years group and at 6.7 per 1000 person-years among those aged 75 years and over. Occupational factors, notably physical demands of work, were associated with the incidence of shoulder pain. Non-occupational factors were also linked to the occurrence of shoulder pain.

CONCLUSION:

Few studies have estimated the incidence of shoulder pain and associated factors among ageing adults. From this systematic review, we conclude that studies on the incidence of shoulder pain are scarce, and that both occupational and non-occupational factors could be associated with the onset of shoulder pain among adults 40 years and over. This very limited evidence calls for more studies on this topic.

SIGNIFICANCE:

Shoulder pain is one of the most frequent musculoskeletal complaints, and its prevalence and consequences increase with age. However, since the prevalence of a recurring condition is determined by its incidence and the number and duration of episodes, it is important to have valid incidence estimates and to conduct aetiological studies on incidence measures to untangle risk factors of the occurrence of shoulder pain from those affecting the duration and number of episodes . In this systematic review, we sought to estimate the incidence of shoulder pain in ageing adults along with its associated factors. This work could lead to better interventions to prevent shoulder pain in older individuals.

PMID:
31514243
DOI:
10.1002/ejp.1482

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