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Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2019 Sep 11;14(1):216. doi: 10.1186/s13023-019-1195-1.

Effects of recombinant human growth hormone treatment on growth, body composition, and safety in infants or toddlers with Prader-Willi syndrome: a randomized, active-controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 05505, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Medical Genetics, Ajou University Hospital, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea.
4
Life Sciences, LG Chem, Ltd, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 05505, Republic of Korea. hwyoo@amc.seoul.kr.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, 06351, Republic of Korea. jindk.jin@samsung.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare complex genetic disorder and is characterized by short stature, muscular hypotonia, abnormal body composition, psychomotor retardation, and hyperphagia. Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment improves the symptoms in children with PWS, and early treatment results in more favorable outcomes. However, systematic studies in infants and toddlers under 2 years of age are lacking. This multicenter, randomized, active-controlled, parallel-group, open-label, Phase III study aimed to evaluate the safety of rhGH (Eutropin, LG Chem, Ltd.) and its efficacy on growth, body composition, and motor and cognitive development in infants and toddlers with PWS compared with a comparator treatment (Genotropin, Pfizer, Inc.). Eligible Korean infants or toddlers with PWS were randomly assigned to receive Eutropin or comparator (both 0.24 mg/kg/week, 6 times/week) for 1 year. Height standard deviation score (SDS), body composition, and motor and cognitive development were measured.

RESULTS:

Thirty-four subjects (less than 24 months old) were randomized into either the Eutropin (N = 17) group or the comparator (N = 17) group. After 52 weeks of rhGH treatment, height SDS and lean body mass increased significantly from baseline in both groups: the mean height SDS change (SD) was 0.75 (0.59) in the Eutropin group and 0.95 (0.66) in the comparator group, and the mean lean body mass change (SD) was 2377.79 (536.25) g in the Eutropin group and 2607.10 (641.36) g in the comparator group. In addition, percent body fat decreased significantly: the mean (SD) change from baseline was - 8.12% (9.86%) in the Eutropin group and - 7.48% (10.26%) in the comparator group. Motor and cognitive developments were also improved in both groups after the 1-year treatment. The incidence of adverse events was similar between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

rhGH treatment for 52 weeks in infants and toddlers with PWS improved growth, body composition, and motor and cognitive development, and efficacy and safety outcomes of Eutropin were comparable to those of Genotropin. Hence, Eutropin is expected to provide safe and clinically meaningful improvements in pediatric patients with PWS.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT02204163) on July 30, 2014. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02204163?term=NCT02204163&rank=1.

KEYWORDS:

Body composition; Growth hormone therapy; Infants and toddlers; Prader-Willi syndrome; Psychomotor development

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