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Cell Rep. 2019 Sep 10;28(11):2966-2978.e5. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2019.08.015.

Similarity and Strength of Glomerular Odor Representations Define a Neural Metric of Sniff-Invariant Discrimination Time.

Author information

1
Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, Maharashtra 411008, India.
2
WIN Olfactory Dynamics Group, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Jahnstrasse 29, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany; Department of Molecular Neurogenetics, Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
3
Department of Basic Neurosciences, School of Medicine, University of Geneva, 1 rue Michel-Servet, 1211 Genève 4, Switzerland.
4
Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Heidelberg University, INF 307, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
5
Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Heidelberg University, INF 307, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany; WIN Olfactory Dynamics Group, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Jahnstrasse 29, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
6
Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, Maharashtra 411008, India; Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Heidelberg University, INF 307, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany; WIN Olfactory Dynamics Group, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Jahnstrasse 29, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany; Department of Basic Neurosciences, School of Medicine, University of Geneva, 1 rue Michel-Servet, 1211 Genève 4, Switzerland. Electronic address: nabraham@iiserpune.ac.in.

Abstract

The olfactory environment is first represented by glomerular activity patterns in the olfactory bulb. It remains unclear how these representations intersect with sampling behavior to account for the time required to discriminate odors. Using different chemical classes, we investigate glomerular representations and sniffing behavior during olfactory decision-making. Mice rapidly discriminate odorants and learn to increase sniffing frequency at a fixed latency after trial initiation, independent of odor identity. Relative to the increase in sniffing frequency, monomolecular odorants are discriminated within 10-40 ms, while binary mixtures require an additional 60-70 ms. Intrinsic imaging of glomerular activity in anesthetized and awake mice reveals that Euclidean distance between activity patterns and the time needed for discriminations are anti-correlated. Therefore, the similarity of glomerular patterns and their activation strengths, rather than sampling behavior, define the extent of neuronal processing required for odor discrimination, establishing a neural metric to predict olfactory discrimination time.

KEYWORDS:

Euclidean distance; intrinsic optical signal imaging; odor discrimination time; olfactory bulb; sniffing

PMID:
31509755
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2019.08.015
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