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J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2019 Nov;145(11):2845-2854. doi: 10.1007/s00432-019-03018-7. Epub 2019 Sep 10.

Structured multi-disciplinary psychosocial care for cancer patients and the perceived quality of care from the patient perspective: a cluster-randomized trial.

Author information

1
Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Informatics (IMBEI), University Medical Centre Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Straße 69, 55131, Mainz, Germany. singers@uni-mainz.de.
2
University Cancer Centre, University Medical Centre Mainz, Mainz, Germany. singers@uni-mainz.de.
3
Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University Medical Centre Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
4
Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Centre Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
5
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Medical Centre Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
6
Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Centre Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
7
Department of Radiation-Oncology, University Medical Centre Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
8
Department of Urology, University Medical Centre Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
9
Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Medical Centre Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
10
Institute of Medical Sociology, University of Halle, Halle, Germany.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We examined whether multi-disciplinary stepped psychosocial care for cancer patients improves quality of care from the patient perspective.

METHODS:

In a university hospital, wards were randomly allocated to either stepped or standard care. Stepped care comprised screening for distress, consultation between doctor and patient, and the provision of psychosocial services. Quality of care was measured with the Quality of Care from the Patient Perspective questionnaire. The analysis employed mixed-effects multivariate regression, adjusting for age and gender.

RESULTS:

Thirteen wards were randomized, and 1012 patients participated (n = 570 in stepped care and n = 442 in standard care). Patients who were highly distressed at baseline had 2.3 times the odds of saying they had had the possibility to converse in private with doctors and/or psychologists/social workers when they were in stepped care compared to standard care, 1.3 times the odds of reporting having experienced shared decision-making, 1.1 times the odds of experiencing their doctors as empathic and personal, and 0.6 times the odds of experiencing the care at the ward to be patient oriented. There was no evidence for an effect of stepped care on perceived quality of care in patients with moderate or low distress.

CONCLUSIONS:

Stepped care can improve some aspects of perceived quality of care in highly distressed patients.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

http://www.clinicaltrials.gov . NCT01859429.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Distress; Psychosocial care; Quality of care; Randomized trial

PMID:
31506739
DOI:
10.1007/s00432-019-03018-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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