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Eur Psychiatry. 2019 Sep 7;62:1-9. doi: 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2019.08.015. [Epub ahead of print]

Birth dimensions, severe mental illness and risk of type 2 diabetes in a cohort of Danish men born in 1953.

Author information

1
Bipolar and Depressive Disorders Unit, Institute of Neuroscience, Hospital Clinic Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERSAM, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: magarriga@clinic.cat.
2
Center for Clinical Research and Prevention, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
3
Center for Clinical Research and Prevention, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Frederiksberg, Denmark; Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Department O, Copenhagen, Denmark.
4
Mental Health Centre Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, iPSYCH The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, Denmark.
5
Center for Clinical Research and Prevention, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Frederiksberg, Denmark; Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Center for Clinical Research and Prevention, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals and Danish Ageing Research Center, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Birth dimensions have been associated with increased risk of both, severe mental illness and type 2 diabetes in adulthood, however, any influence on their co-occurrence has never been examined. This cohort study examine whether birth weight/ponderal index explain or modify the later association between severe mental illness and risk of type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

The Metropolit cohort included 10,863 Danish men born in 1953 with information from age at conscription (between1971-84) until February 15th, 2018. Severe mental illness was defined as the exposure and information was retrieved from the national Danish health registries. Information on type 2 diabetes diagnosis or oral antidiabetic prescriptions was also obtained, as they were the outcome of interest. Information on birth weight/ponderal index was available from birth certificates. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the associations and interactions were tested.

RESULTS:

After 47.1 years of follow-up, 848 (7.8%) and 1320 (12.2%) men developed a severe mental illness or diabetes, respectively. Men with severe mental illness presented higher risk of subsequent diabetes (HR = 1.92; 95%CI, 1.61-2.30). This association was stronger in severe mental ill men with low birth weight (HR = 3.58; 95%CI, 2.11-6.07), than in those normal birth weight (HR = 1.79; 95%CI, 1.45-2.20). This effect modification was most evident for men diagnosed with schizophrenia.

CONCLUSIONS:

Birth information on birth weight/ponderal index could be of interest in diabetes screening on severe mental ill populations (especially in schizophrenia) since they might play a critical role in the increased risk of type 2 diabetes following severe mental illness.

KEYWORDS:

Birth weight; Ponderal index; Schizophrenia; Severe mental illness; Type 2 diabetes mellitus

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