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Int J Colorectal Dis. 2019 Oct;34(10):1757-1762. doi: 10.1007/s00384-019-03390-3. Epub 2019 Sep 9.

Incidence of wound dehiscence after colorectal cancer surgery: results from a national population-based register for colorectal cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Capio St Göran Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. harald.soderback@capiostgoran.se.
2
Department of Clinical Science and Education Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. harald.soderback@capiostgoran.se.
3
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
4
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
6
Department of Clinical Science and Education Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
7
Department of Surgery, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patient-related risk factors for wound dehiscence after colorectal surgery remain obscure.

METHODS:

All open abdominal procedures for colorectal cancer registered in the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry (SCRCR, 5) 2007-2013 were identified. Potential risk factors for wound dehiscence were identified by cross-matching between the SCRCR and the National Patient Register (NPR). The endpoint in this study was reoperation for wound dehiscence registered in either the SCRCR or NPR and patients not reoperated were considered controls.

RESULTS:

A total of 30,050 patients were included in the study. In a multivariable regression analysis, age > 70 years, male gender, BMI > 30, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, history of generalised inflammatory disease, and duration of surgery less than 180 min were independently and significantly associated with increased risk for wound dehiscence. A history of diabetes, chronic renal disease, liver cirrhosis, and distant metastases was not associated with wound dehiscence. The hazard ratio for postoperative death was 1.24 for patients who underwent reoperation for wound dehiscence compared with that for controls.

DISCUSSION:

Patients reoperated for wound dehiscence face a significantly higher postoperative mortality than those without. Risk factors include male gender, age > 70 years, obesity, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and history of generalised inflammatory disease. Patients at high risk for developing wound dehiscence may, if identified preoperatively, benefit from active prevention measures implemented in routine surgical practice.

KEYWORDS:

Colorectal cancer; Surgery; Wound dehiscence

PMID:
31501927
DOI:
10.1007/s00384-019-03390-3

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