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Arch Med Res. 2019 Sep 6;50(4):207-213. doi: 10.1016/j.arcmed.2019.08.003. [Epub ahead of print]

Striatal Glutathione in First-episode Psychosis Patients Measured In Vivo with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

Author information

1
Laboratorio de Psiquiatría Experimental, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Ciudad de México, Mexico.
2
Laboratorio de Psiquiatría Experimental, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Ciudad de México, Mexico; Subdirección de Enseñanza, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Ciudad de México, Mexico.
3
Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York City, NY, USA.
4
Departamento de Urgencias, Hospital Fray Bernardino Álvarez, Ciudad de México, Mexico.
5
Laboratorio de Psiquiatría Experimental, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Ciudad de México, Mexico; Departamento de Neuropsiquiatría, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Ciudad de México, Mexico. Electronic address: fcamilo@unam.mx.

Abstract

Deficits of brain glutathione (GSH), the most abundant and primary antioxidant in living tissue, and associated redox imbalance are postulated to be implicated in schizophrenia. This pilot clinical study compared the levels of striatal GSH, measured in vivo with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) at 3T, in 10 drug-naïve, first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients with those in 9 matched healthy control subjects. The results revealed a significant GSH deficit in FEP patients (0.92 ± 0.24 × 10-3) compared to the healthy control group (1.10 ± 0.10 × 10-3) (U = 25.00, p = 0.02), as well as a positive correlation between GSH levels and the Positive Symptoms subscale of the PANSS in the FEP group (ρ = 0.96; p <0.001). These preliminary findings suggest a possible role of striatal oxidative stress in early-stage psychosis that warrants further scrutiny and confirmation in larger studies.

KEYWORDS:

First-episode; Glutathione; Magnetic resonance spectroscopy; Psychosis; Schizophrenia

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