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Curr Opin Immunol. 2019 Oct;60:163-169. doi: 10.1016/j.coi.2019.08.001. Epub 2019 Sep 6.

How a farming environment protects from atopy.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Immunoregulation and Mucosal Immunology, VIB Center for Inflammation Research, Technologiepark-Zwijnaarde 71, B-9052 Ghent (Zwijnaarde), Belgium; Department of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
2
Laboratory of Immunoregulation and Mucosal Immunology, VIB Center for Inflammation Research, Technologiepark-Zwijnaarde 71, B-9052 Ghent (Zwijnaarde), Belgium; Department of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Department of Respiratory Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: bart.lambrecht@ugent.be.

Abstract

It is now well established that the exposure to certain environments such as farms has the potential to protect from the development of allergies later in life. This protection is achieved when repeated exposure to the farming environment occurs early in life, but persists when children spend sufficient amount of time in contact with livestock and hay, and drink unpasteurized milk. The capacity of farm dust to protect from allergy development lies, amongst others, in the microbe composition in the farm. These protective microbes release various metabolites and cell wall components that change farmers' home dust composition, when compared to urbanized home dust. Additionally, they can colonize various barrier sites (skin, lung, intestine) in farmers' children, leading to persistent changes in the way their immune system and their barrier cells respond to environmental allergens.

PMID:
31499321
DOI:
10.1016/j.coi.2019.08.001

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