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Chemosphere. 2019 Aug 24;239:124667. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.124667. [Epub ahead of print]

Relationships between airborne pollutants, serum albumin adducts and short-term health outcomes in an experimental crossover study.

Author information

1
MRC-PHE Centre for Environment & Health, Department of Analytical, Environmental & Forensic Sciences, School of Population Health & Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine, King's College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London, SE1 9NH, UK.
2
MRC-PHE Centre for Environment & Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, UK.
3
MRC-PHE Centre for Environment & Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, UK; Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, Hirschengraben 84, 8001, Zurich, Switzerland.
4
Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.
5
National Heart & Lung Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Royal Brompton Campus, London, SW3 6LY, UK; NIHR Biomedical Research Unit, Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Trust, London, SW3 6NP, UK.
6
Pulmonary, Adult Critical Care and Sleep Directorate, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, SE1 7EH, UK.
7
MRC-PHE Centre for Environment & Health, Department of Analytical, Environmental & Forensic Sciences, School of Population Health & Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine, King's College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London, SE1 9NH, UK. Electronic address: david.phillips@kcl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Exposure to air pollution can have both short-term and long-term effects on health. However, the relationships between specific pollutants and their effects can be obscured by characteristics of both the pollution and the exposed population. One way of elucidating the relationships is to link exposures and internal changes at the level of the individual. To this end, we combined personal exposure monitoring (59 individuals, Oxford Street II crossover study) with mass-spectrometry-based analyses of putative serum albumin adducts (fixed-step selected reaction monitoring). We attempted to infer adducts' identities using data from another, higher-resolution mass spectrometry method, and were able to detect a semi-synthetic standard with both methods. A generalised least squares regression method was used to test for associations between amounts of adducts and pollution measures (ambient concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter), and between amounts of adducts and short-term health outcomes (measures of lung health and arterial stiffness). Amounts of some putative adducts (e.g., one with a positive mass shift of ∼143 Da) were associated with exposure to pollution (11 associations), and amounts of other adducts were associated with health outcomes (eight associations). Adducts did not appear to provide a link between exposures and short-term health outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Adductomics; Air pollution; Albumin; Exposome

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