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Neuron. 2019 Sep 25;103(6):1005-1015. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2019.08.011. Epub 2019 Sep 5.

Can One Concurrently Record Electrical Spikes from Every Neuron in a Mammalian Brain?

Author information

1
Section of Neurobiology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA; Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. Electronic address: dk@physics.ucsd.edu.
2
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX, USA.
3
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA.
4
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, USA.
5
Department of Engineering, Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA; Department of Molecular and Systems Biology, Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA; Department of Physics, Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA.
6
Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
7
Howard Hughes Medical Institutes, Janelia Research Campus, Ashburn, VA, USA; Department of Bioengineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: harrist@janelia.hhmi.org.

Abstract

The classic approach to measure the spiking response of neurons involves the use of metal electrodes to record extracellular potentials. Starting over 60 years ago with a single recording site, this technology now extends to ever larger numbers and densities of sites. We argue, based on the mechanical and electrical properties of existing materials, estimates of signal-to-noise ratios, assumptions regarding extracellular space in the brain, and estimates of heat generation by the electronic interface, that it should be possible to fabricate rigid electrodes to concurrently record from essentially every neuron in the cortical mantle. This will involve fabrication with existing yet nontraditional materials and procedures. We further emphasize the need to advance materials for improved flexible electrodes as an essential advance to record from neurons in brainstem and spinal cord in moving animals.

KEYWORDS:

action potentials; connectomics; cortex; electrodes; multisite recording; neurocomputation

PMID:
31495645
PMCID:
PMC6763354
[Available on 2020-09-25]
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2019.08.011

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