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J Clin Neurosci. 2019 Sep 4. pii: S0967-5868(19)31377-3. doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2019.08.106. [Epub ahead of print]

Leptin in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis - A meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bonbarun Hospital, 343 Cheongun-ro, Mulgeum-eup, Yangsan 50611, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, BioMedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, 179 Gudeok-ro, Seo-gu, Busan 49241, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, BioMedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, 179 Gudeok-ro, Seo-gu, Busan 49241, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: jungsublee@pusan.ac.kr.

Abstract

To compare the serum levels of leptin and soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R) with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) girls and controls through meta-analysis. The MEDLINE via PubMed, Cochrane, Scopus, and EMBASE database, from the earliest available date of indexing between January 2010 and January 2019, were searched for comparative studies evaluating serum levels of leptin and sOB-R in AIS girls. Two authors performed the data extraction independently. Any discrepancies were resolved by a consensus. Six comparative studies were identified. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of leptin between AIS girls and control [p = 0.19, WMD = -2.06 (-5.14, 1.03) ng/mL]. However, the sOB-R level was significantly higher [p < 0.00001, WMD = 2.85 (1.81, 3.88) ng/mL] and the free leptin index was significantly lower [p = 0.0006, WMD = -0.12 (-0.19, -0.05)] in AIS girls than those of healthy control girls. The body mass index was significantly lower in AIS girls [p = 0.03, WMD = -1.53 (-2.95, -0.12) kg/m2]. The current meta-analysis showed that the level of sOB-R is higher in AIS patients than controls, while the concentration of leptin remains unchanged in AIS patients. Further well-designed studies would be necessary to substantiate our results.

KEYWORDS:

Leptin; Leptin receptor; Meta-analysis; Scoliosis

PMID:
31493992
DOI:
10.1016/j.jocn.2019.08.106

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