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Transplant Proc. 2019 Oct;51(8):2775-2780. doi: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2019.02.067. Epub 2019 Sep 4.

Do We Need Insulin Independence After Islet Transplantation?

Author information

1
Department of General and Transplantation Surgery, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland; Foundation of Research and Science Development, Warsaw, Poland.
2
Foundation of Research and Science Development, Warsaw, Poland. Electronic address: michal.wszola@fundacjabirn.pl.
3
Department of General and Transplantation Surgery, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
4
Foundation of Research and Science Development, Warsaw, Poland.
5
Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
6
Department of Transplantation Medicine and Nephrology, Transplantation Institute, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Most life-threatening diabetes-related complications involve the kidneys, eyes, cardiovascular system, and autonomic nervous system. Clinical islet transplantation (CITx) may be a therapeutic option for some patients. In this study, we analyzed the progression of diabetic complications after CITx and in patients waiting for islet transplantation.

METHODS:

From 2008 to 2015, 67 patients were listed for pancreatic or islet transplantation. We compared beta scores, islet scores, and secondary complications between patients who underwent islet allotransplantation (CITx group, n = 6) and the patients awaiting islet transplantation (wait group, n = 19) at baseline and during the 1-year follow-up.

RESULTS:

In the CITx group, good islet function was observed in 80% of patients 1 month post-transplantation and 40% of patients 1 year post-transplantation; however, no patient achieved insulin independence. One patient who underwent simultaneous islet-kidney transplantation died on day 8 because of severe bleeding in the retroperitoneal space. In 1 case, islet primary nonfunction was observed. Mean islet score in the CITx group 1 year post-transplantation was significantly higher than the pretransplant score and wait group scores at enrollment and 1 year later (P < .01). Increased albuminuria was observed in 3 of 11 (27%) patients in the wait group and 0 patients in the CITx group (P = .08). One patient (9%) in the wait group developed chronic renal failure requiring hemodialysis. Ophthalmologic procedures were required by 47% of patients in the wait group and 0 patients in the CITx group in the first year after transplantation (P < .01).

CONCLUSION:

Successful islet transplantation slows the progression of diabetic complications.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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