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J Psychosom Res. 2019 Aug 25;126:109816. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2019.109816. [Epub ahead of print]

Impact of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder on metabolic control in adolescents with type1 diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Child Psychiatry, University Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Ljubljana, Bohoriceva 20, Ljubljana, Slovenia. Electronic address: jerneja.macek@kclj.si.
2
Clinical Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Disease, University Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Ljubljana, Bohoriceva 20, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Vrazov trg 2, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia.
3
Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Vrazov trg 2, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia.
4
Clinical Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Disease, University Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Ljubljana, Bohoriceva 20, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1D) incidence is increasing in pediatric population. Good metabolic control, measured by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), significantly reduces the risk for chronic complications. Comorbid disorders, including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), may influence glycemic control. To date little is known about the prevalence of ADHD among adolescents with T1D and its influence on diabetes self-management. Therefore, we aimed to identify adolescents with T1D and ADHD and assess the effect of ADHD on metabolic control.

METHOD:

This cross-sectional case-control study included 101 patients (11-17 years old) with T1D. Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) questionnaire and subsequent psychiatric clinical examination were used to identify ADHD in a group with T1D. Indicators of metabolic control were collected from available medical documentation for preceding 12 months and compared between the group of patients with T1D and ADHD and the group of T1D patients without ADHD.

RESULTS:

ADHD was diagnosed in 11.9% adolescents with T1D (12 of 101). We found a statistically significant difference (p = .022) in HbA1c between the two groups - higher in the group with T1D and ADHD (8.4% or 68.3 mmol/mol) than in the group with T1D without ADHD (7.8% or 61.7 mmol/mol).

CONCLUSIONS:

Almost 12% of adolescents with type 1 diabetes were diagnosed with ADHD and they had poorer glycemic control. Adolescents with T1D and ADHD must be diagnosed early and offered appropriate treatment focused on preventing negative ADHD impact on metabolic control.

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