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Adv Exp Med Biol. 2019;1178:103-112. doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-25650-0_6.

Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation in Fibrosis and Aging.

Author information

1
School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores, Liverpool, UK. i.hargreaves@ucl.ac.uk.
2
Pharma Nord (UK) Ltd, Morpeth, Newcastle, UK.

Abstract

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a vitamin-like substance which functions as an electron carrier within the mitochondrial respiratory chain, as well as serving as an important intracellular antioxidant. Most of the body's CoQ10 requirements are met by endogenous synthesis, although the capacity for CoQ10 production decreases substantially with increasing age. In this article we have reviewed the potential role of CoQ10 supplementation in the treatment of tissue fibrosis, which has been implicated in the age-related loss of function of various organs including the heart. Clinical studies have indicated that CoQ10 supplementation may decrease the level of cardiovascular fibrosis to which older individuals are subjected, and thereby improve cardiovascular function and reduce the risk of cardiovascular associated mortality. Although the factors responsible for the anti-fibrotic action of CoQ10 have yet to be fully elucidated, its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions are thought to be major contributors to its clinical efficacy in the treatment of this age-related disorder.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular disease; Coenzyme Q10; Fibrosis; Oxidative stress; Supplementation

PMID:
31493224
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-030-25650-0_6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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