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Antioxidants (Basel). 2019 Sep 5;8(9). pii: E376. doi: 10.3390/antiox8090376.

Linking What We Eat to Our Mood: A Review of Diet, Dietary Antioxidants, and Depression.

Huang Q1,2,3, Liu H4,5, Suzuki K6, Ma S7, Liu C8,9.

Author information

1
College of Food Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China. hqyaaaaaa@163.com.
2
The Key Laboratory of Food Quality and Safety of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou 510642, China. hqyaaaaaa@163.com.
3
Graduate School of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokorozawa 359-1192, Japan. hqyaaaaaa@163.com.
4
College of Food Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China. liuhuanjzcd@126.com.
5
The Key Laboratory of Food Quality and Safety of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou 510642, China. liuhuanjzcd@126.com.
6
Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokorozawa 359-1192, Japan. katsu.suzu@waseda.jp.
7
Graduate School of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokorozawa 359-1192, Japan. masihui@toki.waseda.jp.
8
College of Food Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China. liuch@scau.edu.cn.
9
The Key Laboratory of Food Quality and Safety of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou 510642, China. liuch@scau.edu.cn.

Abstract

Studies have shown that diet and nutrition play significant roles in the prevention of depression and its clinical treatment. The present review aims to provide a clear understanding of the associations between diet patterns, specific foods, nutrients such as antioxidants, and depression. As a result, balanced dietary patterns such as the Mediterranean diet and certain foods such as fish, fresh vegetables, and fruits have been associated with a lower risk of depression or depressive symptoms, while high-fat Western diets and sugar-sweetened beverages have been associated with higher risk of depression or depressive symptoms. Dietary antioxidants such as green tea polyphenols or isoflavonoid intake have been negatively associated with depression or depressive symptoms. It is concluded that diet patterns, specific foods, and antioxidants play important roles in the prevention and clinical treatment of depression.

KEYWORDS:

cytokine; depression; dietary pattern; food; inflammation; nutrition; oxidative stress

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