Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2019 Sep 10;74(10):1317-1328. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2019.06.069.

Early-Life Environmental Exposures and Blood Pressure in Children.

Author information

1
ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiologa y Salud Pública, Madrid, Spain.
2
Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
3
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
4
Vytauto Didziojo Universitetas, Kaunus, Lithuania.
5
Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece; Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; Department of Genetics and Cell Biology, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
6
INSERM, UMR1153 Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité Center (CRESS), Early ORigins of the Child's Health and Development Team (ORCHAD), Paris Descartes University, Paris, France.
7
Bradford Institute for Health Research, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, United Kingdom.
8
Inserm, Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Institute of Advanced Biosciences, Team of Environmental Epidemiology applied to Reproduction and Respiratory Health, Grenoble, France; CHU Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, France.
9
MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
10
Inserm, Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Institute of Advanced Biosciences, Team of Environmental Epidemiology applied to Reproduction and Respiratory Health, Grenoble, France.
11
ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiologa y Salud Pública, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: xavier.basagana@isglobal.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Growing evidence exists about the fetal and environmental origins of hypertension, but mainly limited to single-exposure studies. The exposome has been proposed as a more holistic approach by studying many exposures simultaneously.

OBJECTIVES:

This study aims to evaluate the association between a wide range of prenatal and postnatal exposures and blood pressure (BP) in children.

METHODS:

Systolic and diastolic BP were measured among 1,277 children from the European HELIX (Human Early-Life Exposome) cohort aged 6 to 11 years. Prenatal (n = 89) and postnatal (n = 128) exposures include air pollution, built environment, meteorology, natural spaces, traffic, noise, chemicals, and lifestyles. Two methods adjusted for confounders were applied: an exposome-wide association study considering the exposures independently, and the deletion-substitution-addition algorithm considering all the exposures simultaneously.

RESULTS:

Decreases in systolic BP were observed with facility density (β change for an interquartile-range increase in exposure: -1.7 mm Hg [95% confidence interval (CI): -2.5 to -0.8 mm Hg]), maternal concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl 118 (-1.4 mm Hg [95% CI: -2.6 to -0.2 mm Hg]) and child concentrations of dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE: -1.6 mm Hg [95% CI: -2.4 to -0.7 mm Hg]), hexachlorobenzene (-1.5 mm Hg [95% CI: -2.4 to -0.6 mm Hg]), and mono-benzyl phthalate (-0.7 mm Hg [95% CI: -1.3 to -0.1 mm Hg]), whereas increases in systolic BP were observed with outdoor temperature during pregnancy (1.6 mm Hg [95% CI: 0.2 to 2.9 mm Hg]), high fish intake during pregnancy (2.0 mm Hg [95% CI: 0.4 to 3.5 mm Hg]), maternal cotinine concentrations (1.2 mm Hg [95% CI: -0.3 to 2.8 mm Hg]), and child perfluorooctanoate concentrations (0.9 mm Hg [95% CI: 0.1 to 1.6 mm Hg]). Decreases in diastolic BP were observed with outdoor temperature at examination (-1.4 mm Hg [95% CI: -2.3 to -0.5 mm Hg]) and child DDE concentrations (-1.1 mm Hg [95% CI: -1.9 to -0.3 mm Hg]), whereas increases in diastolic BP were observed with maternal bisphenol-A concentrations (0.7 mm Hg [95% CI: 0.1 to 1.4 mm Hg]), high fish intake during pregnancy (1.2 mm Hg [95% CI: -0.2 to 2.7 mm Hg]), and child copper concentrations (0.9 mm Hg [95% CI: 0.3 to 1.6 mm Hg]).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggests that early-life exposure to several chemicals, as well as built environment and meteorological factors, may affect BP in children.

KEYWORDS:

blood pressure; chemicals; children; cohort; environment; epidemiology; exposome

PMID:
31488269
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2019.06.069

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center