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Pregnancy Hypertens. 2019 Jul;17:82-88. doi: 10.1016/j.preghy.2019.05.014. Epub 2019 May 9.

Peripartum cardiomyopathy with co-incident preeclampsia: A cohort study of clinical risk factors and outcomes among commercially insured women.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
2
Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Research Institute, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
3
Research Institute, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
4
Research Institute, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
5
Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Research Institute, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
6
Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Research Institute, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: louise.pilote@mcgill.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) and preeclampsia are strongly associated, yet a description of risk factors for PPCM among women with preeclampsia is currently lacking. Additionally, the effect of preeclampsia on PPCM-related outcomes is not well known.

METHODS:

We constructed a cohort of delivery admissions from 2011 to 2014 using a large US administrative database (Marketscan). We assessed risk factors for the development of PPCM among women with preeclampsia. We compared the risks of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) at 6 months between PPCM with co-incident preeclampsia (pePPCM) and PPCM without preeclampsia (npePPCM).

RESULTS:

We included 1,024,035 pregnancies, of which 64,503 (6.3%) had preeclampsia. A total of 874 had PPCM (283 with preeclampsia and 591 without preeclampsia). Among women with preeclampsia, clinical risk factors for PPCM consisted in chronic kidney disease (OR 3.18, 95% CI [1.51, 6.69]), multiple pregnancy (OR 2.11, 95% CI [1.49, 2.98]), chronic hypertension (OR 1.88, 95% CI [1.43, 2.47]), advanced maternal age (OR 1.82, 95% CI [1.42, 2.33]), and type 2 diabetes (OR 1.58, 95% CI [1.00, 2.48]). Women with pePPCM had a higher risk of MACE than women with npePPCM (adjusted RR 1.29, 95% CI [1.06, 1.57]) due to increased rates of clinical heart failure and pulmonary embolism in the pePPCM group. Mortality did not differ between groups.

CONCLUSION:

Preeclamptic women with risk factors for PPCM and women with pePPCM at increased risk of MACE should be followed closely. Further studies are required to determine whether preeclampsia affects the long-term prognosis of women with PPCM.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiomyopathy; Heart failure; Preeclampsia

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