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Aging (Albany NY). 2019 Sep 3;11(17):6792-6804. doi: 10.18632/aging.102204. Epub 2019 Sep 3.

Stress adaptation in older adults with and without cognitive impairment: an fMRI pattern-based similarity analysis.

Wang X1, Heffner KL2,3, Anthony M2, Lin F2,4,5,6,7.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.
2
School of Nursing, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics and Aging, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.
5
Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.
6
Department of Neuroscience, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.
7
Department of Neurology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The capacity to adapt to environmental stressors is essential for older adults' health and well-being. It is unclear how cognitive impairment may disrupt the capacity. Here we examined the relationship between self-perceptions of stress and the neurobiological response to a laboratory model of stress adaptation in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), a group at high risk for dementia.

RESULTS:

aMCI group and cognitively healthy controls did not differ in neurobiological acute stress recovery (indexed by similarity in neural patterns at baseline and after recovery from cognitive challenges). However, compared to controls, aMCI group had significantly lower scores on PSS-PW. Notably, higher PSS-PW was associated with greater acute neural recovery in controls, but not aMCI.

METHODS:

We assessed self-perceptions of stress adaptation with the Perceived Stress Scale subscales, measuring perceived helplessness (i.e., negatively worded items, PSS-NW) and self-efficacy (i.e., positively worded items, PSS-PW) in response to stress. At a subsequent laboratory fMRI visit, we indexed neurobiological stress adaptation by assessing and comparing functional network connectivity at baseline and immediately following, and after recovery from, cognitive challenges.

CONCLUSIONS:

Studying stress adaptation in aMCI may shed light on pathways that contribute to the onset and progress of cognitive deterioration in aging.

KEYWORDS:

amnestic mild cognitive impairment; functional magnetic resonance imaging; pattern analysis; stress adaptation

PMID:
31480017
DOI:
10.18632/aging.102204
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