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PLoS Genet. 2019 Sep 3;15(9):e1008378. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1008378. eCollection 2019 Sep.

NME5 frameshift variant in Alaskan Malamutes with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

Author information

1
Institute of Genetics, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern,Bern, Switzerland.
2
Kleintierpraxis Laupeneck, Bern, Switzerland.
3
Institute of Veterinary Pathology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
4
Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens GA, United States of America.
5
Department of Veterinary Biosciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
6
Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
7
Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
8
Kennel Club Genetics Centre, Animal Health Trust, Newmarket, Suffolk CB UU, United Kingdom.
9
Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN, United States of America.
10
Department of Population Health and Reproduction, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA, United States of America.

Abstract

Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a hereditary defect of motile cilia in humans and several domestic animal species. Typical clinical findings are chronic recurrent infections of the respiratory tract and fertility problems. We analyzed an Alaskan Malamute family, in which two out of six puppies were affected by PCD. The parents were unaffected suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. Linkage and homozygosity mapping defined critical intervals comprising ~118 Mb. Whole genome sequencing of one case and comparison to 601 control genomes identified a disease associated frameshift variant, c.43delA, in the NME5 gene encoding a sparsely characterized protein associated with ciliary function. Nme5-/- knockout mice exhibit doming of the skull, hydrocephalus and sperm flagellar defects. The genotypes at NME5:c.43delA showed the expected co-segregation with the phenotype in the Alaskan Malamute family. An additional unrelated Alaskan Malamute with PCD and hydrocephalus that became available later in the study was also homozygous mutant at the NME5:c.43delA variant. The mutant allele was not present in more than 1000 control dogs from different breeds. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated absence of the NME5 protein from nasal epithelia of an affected dog. We therefore propose NME5:c.43delA as the most likely candidate causative variant for PCD in Alaskan Malamutes. These findings enable genetic testing to avoid the unintentional breeding of affected dogs in the future. Furthermore, the results of this study identify NME5 as a novel candidate gene for unsolved human PCD and/or hydrocephalus cases.

PMID:
31479451
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pgen.1008378
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