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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2019 Oct;27(10):1661-1670. doi: 10.1002/oby.22592. Epub 2019 Sep 3.

Association of BMI with Linear Growth and Pubertal Development.

Author information

1
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.
3
Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore, Singapore.
4
Centre for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, McGill University Health Centre Research Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
6
Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Maine Medical Center, Portland, Maine, USA.
7
Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Portland, Maine, USA.
8
Diabetes Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
9
Department of Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
10
National Institute for Health Research Bristol Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
11
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
12
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of BMI with subsequent statural growth among children born in the era of the obesity epidemic.

METHODS:

Among 18,271 children from Belarus (n = 16,781, born 1996 to 1997) and the United States (n = 1,490, born 1999 to 2002), multivariable linear and ordinal logistic regression was used to analyze associations of BMI z score from infancy to adolescence with subsequent standardized length and height velocity, standing height and its components (trunk and leg lengths), and pubertal timing.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of early adolescent obesity was 6.2% in Belarus and 12.8% in the United States. In both Belarusian and US children, higher BMI z scores in infancy and childhood were associated with faster length and height velocity in early life, while higher BMI z scores during middle childhood were associated with slower length and height velocity during adolescence. Associations with greater standing height and trunk length and earlier pubertal development in adolescence were stronger for BMI z scores at middle childhood than BMI z scores at birth or infancy.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings in both Belarus and the United States support the role of higher BMI in accelerating linear growth in early life (taller stature and longer trunk length) but earlier pubertal development and slower linear growth during adolescence.

PMID:
31479205
PMCID:
PMC6756952
[Available on 2020-04-01]
DOI:
10.1002/oby.22592

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