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Lancet. 2019 Aug 31;394(10200):781-792. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(19)31775-1.

Alcohol use disorders.

Author information

1
Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
2
Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
3
Corporación Nuevos Rumbos, Bogotá, Colombia.
4
Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada.
5
Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada; Institute of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, and Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Longitudinal Studies, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; Department of International Health Projects, Institute for Leadership and Health Management, IM Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address: jtrehm@gmail.com.

Abstract

Alcohol use disorders consist of disorders characterised by compulsive heavy alcohol use and loss of control over alcohol intake. Alcohol use disorders are some of the most prevalent mental disorders globally, especially in high-income and upper-middle-income countries; and are associated with high mortality and burden of disease, mainly due to medical consequences, such as liver cirrhosis or injury. Despite their high prevalence, alcohol use disorders are undertreated partly because of the high stigma associated with them, but also because of insufficient systematic screening in primary health care, although effective and cost-effective psychosocial and pharmacological interventions do exist. Primary health care should be responsible for most treatment, with routine screening for alcohol use, and the provision of a staggered treatment response, from brief advice to pharmacological treatment. Clinical interventions for these disorders should be embedded in a supportive environment, which can be bolstered by the creation of alcohol control policies aimed at reducing the overall level of consumption.

PMID:
31478502
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(19)31775-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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