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Br J Nutr. 2019 Dec 14;122(11):1303-1312. doi: 10.1017/S0007114519002253.

Association of sugar-sweetened beverage intake at 18 months and 5 years of age with adiposity outcomes at 6 years of age: the Singapore GUSTO mother-offspring cohort.

Author information

1
Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore117609.
2
Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore117549.
3
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore117597.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore119228.
5
Centre for Research in Epidemiology and StatisticS (CRESS), Université de Paris, Inserm, Inra, F-75004 Paris, France.
6
Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charite University Medical Centre, 10117 Berlin, Germany.
7
Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit and National Institute for Health Research Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital, Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK.
8
Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland 1023, New Zealand.
9
Divisions of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology, Khoo Teck Puat-National University Children's Medical Institute, National University Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore119228.
10
Maternal Fetal Medicine, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore229899.
11
Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore169857.
12
Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
13
Folkhälsan Research Center, FI-00250 Helsinki, Finland.
14
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland.
15
Departments of Paediatrics, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore119228.
16
Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore636921.
17
Division of Paediatric Endocrinology, Khoo Teck Puat-National University Children's Medical Institute, National University Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore119074.

Abstract

Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) by infants and young children are less explored in Asian populations. The Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes cohort study examined associations between SSB intake at 18 months and 5 years of age, with adiposity measures at 6 years of age. We studied Singaporean infants/children with SSB intake assessed by FFQ at 18 months of age (n 555) and 5 years of age (n 767). The median for SSB intakes is 28 (interquartile range 5·5-98) ml at 18 months of age and 111 (interquartile range 57-198) ml at 5 years of age. Association between SSB intake (100 ml/d increments and tertile categories) and adiposity measures (BMI standard deviation scores (sd units), sum of skinfolds (SSF)) and overweight/obesity status were examined using multivariable linear and Poisson regression models, respectively. After adjusting for confounders and additionally for energy intake, SSB intake at age 18 months were not significantly associated with later adiposity measures and overweight/obesity outcomes. In contrast, at age 5 years, SSB intake when modelled as 100 ml/d increments were associated with higher BMI by 0·09 (95 % CI 0·02, 0·16) sd units, higher SSF thickness by 0·68 (95 % CI 0·06, 1·44) mm and increased risk of overweight/obesity by 1·2 (95 % CI 1·07, 1·23) times at age 6 years. Trends were consistent with SSB intake modelled as categorical tertiles. In summary, SSB intake in young childhood is associated with higher risks of adiposity and overweight/obesity. Public health policies working to reduce SSB consumption need to focus on prevention programmes targeted at young children.

KEYWORDS:

Adiposity; Asian populations; Cohort studies; Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes; Infants; Preschoolers; Sugar-sweetened beverages

PMID:
31477198
DOI:
10.1017/S0007114519002253

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