Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Dev Neurosci. 2019 Nov;78:198-209. doi: 10.1016/j.ijdevneu.2019.08.004. Epub 2019 Aug 30.

The neuroprotective role of melatonin in a gestational hypermethioninemia model.

Author information

1
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Biológicas: Bioquímica, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, 2600-Anexo, Porto Alegre, RS, 90035-003, Brazil; Laboratório de Neuroproteção e Doenças Neurometabólicas, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, 2600-Anexo, Porto Alegre, RS, 90035-003, Brazil.
2
Laboratório de Neuroproteção e Doenças Neurometabólicas, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, 2600-Anexo, Porto Alegre, RS, 90035-003, Brazil.
3
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Biológicas: Bioquímica, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, 2600-Anexo, Porto Alegre, RS, 90035-003, Brazil.
4
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Biológicas: Bioquímica, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, 2600-Anexo, Porto Alegre, RS, 90035-003, Brazil; Laboratório de Histofisiologia Comparada, Departamento de Ciências Morfológicas, ICBS, UFRGS, Rua Sarmento Leite 500, Porto Alegre, RS, 90050-170, Brazil.
5
Laboratório de Hematologia e Citologia Clínica, Universidade Federal do Pampa, BR 472, Km 592, Caixa Postal 118, Uruguaiana, RS, 97508-000, Brazil.
6
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Biológicas: Bioquímica, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, 2600-Anexo, Porto Alegre, RS, 90035-003, Brazil; Laboratório de Neuroproteção e Doenças Neurometabólicas, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, 2600-Anexo, Porto Alegre, RS, 90035-003, Brazil; Departamento de Bioquímica, ICBS, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Rua Ramiro Barcelos, 2600-Anexo, Porto Alegre, RS, 90035-003, Brazil.
7
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Biológicas: Bioquímica, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, 2600-Anexo, Porto Alegre, RS, 90035-003, Brazil; Laboratório de Neuroproteção e Doenças Neurometabólicas, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, 2600-Anexo, Porto Alegre, RS, 90035-003, Brazil; Departamento de Bioquímica, ICBS, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Rua Ramiro Barcelos, 2600-Anexo, Porto Alegre, RS, 90035-003, Brazil. Electronic address: wyse@ufrgs.br.

Abstract

Elevated levels of methionine in blood characterize the hypermethioninemia, which may have genetic or non-genetic origin, as for example from high protein diet. Born rats from hypermethioninemic mothers presented cerebral oxidative stress, inhibition of Na+,K+-ATPase, memory deficit and ultrastructure cerebral changes. Melatonin is a hormone involved in circadian rhythm and has antioxidant effects. The aim of this study was to verify the possible neuroprotective effects of melatonin administration in hypermethioninemic pregnant rats on damage to biomolecules (Na+,K+-ATPase, sulfhydryl content and DNA damage index) and behavior (open field, novel object recognition and water maze tasks), as well as its effect on cells morphology by electron microscopy in offspring. Wistar female rats received methionine (2.68 μmol/g body weight) and/or melatonin (10 mg/kg body weight) by subcutaneous injections during entire pregnancy. Control rats received saline. Biochemical analyzes were performed at 21 and 30 days of life of offspring and behavioral analyzes were performed only at 30 days of age in male pups. Results showed that gestational hypermethioninemia diminished Na+,K+-ATPase activity and sulfhydryl content and increased DNA damage at 21 and 30 days of life. Melatonin was able to totally prevent Na+,K+-ATPase activity alteration at 21 days and partially prevent its alteration at 30 days of rats life. Melatonin was unable in to prevent sulfhydryl and DNA damage at two ages. It also improved DNA damage, but not at level of saline animals (controls). Regarding to behavioral tests, data showed that pups exposed to gestational hypermethioninemia decreased reference memory in water maze, spent more time to the center of the open field and did not differentiate the objects in the recognition test. Melatonin was able to prevent the deficit in novel object recognition task. Electron microscopy revealed ultrastructure alterations in neurons of hypermethioninemic at both ages of offspring, whose were prevented by melatonin. These findings suggest that melatonin may be a good neuroprotective to minimize the harmful effects of gestational hypermethioninemia on offspring.

KEYWORDS:

DNA damage; Gestational hypermethioninemia; Melatonin; Memory; Ultrastructural

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center