Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Front Psychiatry. 2019 Aug 16;10:571. doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2019.00571. eCollection 2019.

Association of Transfusion With Risks of Dementia or Alzheimer's Disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

Lin SY1,2, Hsu WH1,3, Lin CC1,4, Lin CL5,6, Yeh HC1, Kao CH1,7,8.

Author information

1
Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
2
Division of Nephrology and Kidney Institute, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
3
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, China Medical University Hospital and China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
4
Department of Family Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
5
Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital and Center of Augmented Intelligence in Healthcare, Taichung, Taiwan.
6
College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
7
Department of Nuclear Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
8
Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan.

Abstract

Purpose: The association between neurodegenerative diseases and transfusion remains to be investigated. Methods: The study population comprised 63,813 patients who underwent a blood transfusion and 63,813 propensity score-matched controls between 2000 and 2010. Data were obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, which is maintained by the National Health Research Institutes. A Cox regression analysis was conducted to elucidate the relationship between blood transfusions and the risk of dementia. Results: A multivariate Cox regression analysis of factors, such as age, sex, cardiovascular ischemia disease, and depression, revealed that patients who underwent a blood transfusion showed a 1.73-fold higher risk of dementia [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.62-1.84] and a 1.37-fold higher risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) [95% CI = 1.13-1.66] than those who did not. Patients who received a transfusion of washed red blood cells showed a 2.37-fold higher risk of dementia (95% CI = 1.63-3.44) than those who did not. Conclusion: Blood transfusion, especially transfusion of any type of red blood cells is associated with an increased risk of dementia.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database; cohort study; dementia; transfusion

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Frontiers Media SA Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center