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Behav Brain Res. 2019 Aug 28;376:112183. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2019.112183. [Epub ahead of print]

Probiotic treatment improves the impaired spatial cognitive performance and restores synaptic plasticity in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Islamic Republic of Iran.
2
Neuroscience Research Center, Institute of Neuropharmacology, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran. Electronic address: gsepehri@yahoo.com.
3
Physiology Research Center, Institute for Basic Sciences, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran. Electronic address: salami-m@kaums.ac.ir.

Abstract

Studies demonstrate that damage to gut microbiota is associated with some brain disorders including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accordingly, supporting gut microbiota has been considered as a possible strategy for AD treatment. We evaluated behavioral and electrophysiological aspects of the brain function in an animal model of AD made by intracerebroventricular injection of β-amyloid. Two groups of control rats recieved either water as vehicle (Con) or probitics (Pro + Con). Also two groups of Alzheimeric animals were treated by either vehicle (Alz) or probiotics (Pro + Alz). Sham group was only subjected to surgical procedure and received the vehicle. Spatial learning and memory was assessed in Morris water maze. Also, basic synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP) were assessed by recording field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in hippocampus. Change in anti-oxidant/oxidant factors was assessed via measuring plasma level of total anti-oxidant capacity (TAC) and malondealdehyde (MDA). Brain staining was done to confirm β-amyloid accumulation. Fecal bacteria quantification was accomplished to find how probiotic supplement affected gut microbiota. We found that while the Alz animals displayed a weak spatial performance, probiotic treatment improved the maze navigation in the Pro + Alz rats. Whereas basic synaptic transmission remained unchanged in the Alz rats, LTP was suppressed in this group. Probiotic treatment significantly restored LTP in the Pro + Alz group and further enhanced it in the Pro + Con rats. The intervention also showed a favorable effect on balance of the anti-oxidant/oxidant biomarkers in the Pro + Alz rats. This study provides the first proof on positive effect of probiotics on synaptic plasticity in an animal model of AD.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Animal model; Long- term potentiation; Probiotics; Spatial memory

PMID:
31472194
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbr.2019.112183

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