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Adv Exp Med Biol. 2019;1155:293-300. doi: 10.1007/978-981-13-8023-5_28.

Relationship Among Dietary Taurine Intake, Dietary Attitudes, Dietary Behaviors, and Life Stress by Depression in Korean Female College Students.

Author information

1
Department of Food and Nutrition, Inha University, Incheon, South Korea.
2
Majors in Nutrition Education, Graduate School of Education, Inha University, Incheon, South Korea.
3
Department of Chemistry, Konkuk University, Seoul, South Korea. shkim@konkuk.ac.kr.
4
Department of Food and Nutrition, Inha University, Incheon, South Korea. kjchang@inha.ac.kr.
5
Majors in Nutrition Education, Graduate School of Education, Inha University, Incheon, South Korea. kjchang@inha.ac.kr.

Abstract

This study was conducted to investigate the correlation between dietary taurine intake, nutrients intake, dietary attitudes, dietary behaviors, and life stress by depression in Korean female college students. Depression was measured by self-reported symptoms of depression on the CES-D (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression) scale. The subjects of this cross-sectional study included 56 female college students with depression (depression group, DG) and 122 female students without depression (control group, CG). Self-reported life stress score was determined using the life stress scale developed for Korean college students. Intakes of dietary taurine and nutrients were assessed using 3-day food records (2 weekdays and 1 weekend day) and evaluated using the computer aided nutrition program 4.0 version. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 24.0. We observed no significant difference in the average dietary taurine intake between DG (87.6 mg/day) and CG (92.3 mg/day). The average dietary intakes of vitamin A and calcium in DG were significantly lower as compared to CG (p < 0.05). The average total scores of dietary attitudes (p < 0.01) and dietary behaviors (p < 0.05) in DG were significantly lower as compared to CG. The average total life stress score (p < 0.001) and all stress categories were significantly higher in DG as compared to CG. No significant correlation was observed between the CES-D scale score and dietary taurine intake. However, there were significant negative correlations between the CES-D scale score and vitamin A, folic acid, vitamin C, and calcium intakes (p < 0.05), dietary attitudes, and dietary behaviors (p < 0.01). Scores of the CES-D scale and life stress showed a significantly positive correlation (p < 0.01). Therefore, continuous nutrition education and counseling for good dietary attitudes and behaviors are required. Future studies need to be undertaken to confirm the correlation between dietary taurine intake and depression by intervention with taurine.

KEYWORDS:

Depression; Dietary behaviors; Dietary taurine intake; Korean female college students; Life stress

PMID:
31468408
DOI:
10.1007/978-981-13-8023-5_28
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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