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AIDS Behav. 2019 Aug 28. doi: 10.1007/s10461-019-02658-7. [Epub ahead of print]

Homonegativity Experienced over the Life Course by Young Black Gay, Bisexual and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men (YB-GBMSM) Living with HIV in Atlanta, Georgia.

Author information

1
Hubert Department of Global Health, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia.
2
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia.
3
Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
4
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
5
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
6
Hubert Department of Global Health, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia. Sophia.ahmed.hussen@emory.edu.
7
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Sophia.ahmed.hussen@emory.edu.

Abstract

Minority stress theory posits that homonegativity-whether experienced, anticipated, or internalized-adversely impacts health. We conducted qualitative interviews with 28 YB-GBMSM living with HIV to explore manifestations of homonegativity over the life course. Thematic analysis identified patterns in the ways that homonegativity was discussed at different points in participants' lives. Stifling, and sometimes traumatic, familial and religious environments led to experienced homonegativity early in life. These experiences led to anticipated and internalized homonegativity, which in turn shaped sexual identity formation processes in adolescence and into young adulthood. Ultimately, many participants distanced themselves from home environments, seeking and often finding extrafamilial support. Most participants eventually reached self-acceptance of both their sexuality and HIV status. In conclusion, experienced, anticipated and internalized homonegativity were pervasive as YB-GBMSM navigated family and religious environments over the life course. Future interventions should work with youth, families, and churches to prevent these harmful experiences.

KEYWORDS:

HIV/AIDS; Sexual minority health

PMID:
31463712
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-019-02658-7

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