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Nat Commun. 2019 Aug 27;10(1):3871. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-11807-4.

RST1 and RIPR connect the cytosolic RNA exosome to the Ski complex in Arabidopsis.

Author information

1
Institut de biologie moléculaire des plantes, CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France. hlange@unistra.fr.
2
Institut de biologie moléculaire des plantes, CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.
3
Institut Jean-Pierre Bourgin, INRA, AgroParisTech, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, Versailles, France.
4
Plateforme protéomique Strasbourg Esplanade FR1589 du CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.
5
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany.
6
Institut de biologie moléculaire des plantes, CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France. dominique.gagliardi@ibmp-cnrs.unistra.fr.

Abstract

The RNA exosome is a key 3'-5' exoribonuclease with an evolutionarily conserved structure and function. Its cytosolic functions require the co-factors SKI7 and the Ski complex. Here we demonstrate by co-purification experiments that the ARM-repeat protein RESURRECTION1 (RST1) and RST1 INTERACTING PROTEIN (RIPR) connect the cytosolic Arabidopsis RNA exosome to the Ski complex. rst1 and ripr mutants accumulate RNA quality control siRNAs (rqc-siRNAs) produced by the post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) machinery when mRNA degradation is compromised. The small RNA populations observed in rst1 and ripr mutants are also detected in mutants lacking the RRP45B/CER7 core exosome subunit. Thus, molecular and genetic evidence supports a physical and functional link between RST1, RIPR and the RNA exosome. Our data reveal the existence of additional cytosolic exosome co-factors besides the known Ski subunits. RST1 is not restricted to plants, as homologues with a similar domain architecture but unknown function exist in animals, including humans.

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