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Obes Sci Pract. 2019 Mar 26;5(4):291-303. doi: 10.1002/osp4.336. eCollection 2019 Aug.

Self-report dieting and long-term changes in body mass index and waist circumference.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health Solutions National Institute for Health and Welfare Helsinki Finland.
2
Department of Public Health University of Helsinki Helsinki Finland.

Abstract

Objective:

This prospective study explores whether dieting attempts and previous changes in weight predict changes in body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC).

Methods:

The study was based on the representative Finnish Health 2000 Survey and on its follow-up examination 11 years later. The sample included 2,785 participants, aged 30-69. BMI and WC were determined at health examinations. Information on dieting attempts and previous changes in weight was collected using a questionnaire including questions on whether participant had tried to lose weight (no/yes), gained weight (no/yes) or lost weight (no/yes) during the previous year.

Results:

At baseline, 32.8% were dieters. Of these, 28.4% had lost weight during the previous year. Dieters had higher BMI and WC than non-dieters. During the follow-up, the measures increased more in dieters and in persons with previous weight loss. The mean BMI changes in non-dieters versus dieters were 0.74 (standard deviation [SD] 2.13) kg/m2 and 1.06 (SD 2.77) kg/m2 (P = 0.002), respectively. The corresponding numbers for those with no previous weight change versus those who had lost weight were 0.65 (SD 2.07) kg/m2 and 1.52 (SD 2.61) kg/m2. The increases in BMI and WC were most notable in dieters with initially normal weight.

Conclusions:

The increases in BMI and WC were greater in dieters than in non-dieters, suggesting dieting attempts to be non-functional in the long term in the general population.

KEYWORDS:

Dieting attempts; follow‐up; obesity; weight change

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declared no conflict of interest.

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