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Diabetologia. 2019 Oct;62(10):1779-1788. doi: 10.1007/s00125-019-4914-1. Epub 2019 Aug 27.

Developmental overnutrition and obesity and type 2 diabetes in offspring.

Perng W1,2,3, Oken E4,5, Dabelea D6,7,8.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center, Aurora, CO, USA.
2
Lifecourse Epidemiology of Adiposity and Diabetes (LEAD) Center, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, 13001 East 17th Ave, Box B119, Room W3110, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA.
3
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
4
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse (CoRAL), Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School/Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center, Aurora, CO, USA. Dana.Dabelea@cuanschutz.edu.
7
Lifecourse Epidemiology of Adiposity and Diabetes (LEAD) Center, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, 13001 East 17th Ave, Box B119, Room W3110, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. Dana.Dabelea@cuanschutz.edu.
8
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center, Aurora, CO, USA. Dana.Dabelea@cuanschutz.edu.

Abstract

Childhood obesity has reached pandemic proportions, and youth-onset type 2 diabetes is following suit. This review summarises the literature on the influence of developmental overnutrition, resulting from maternal diabetes, obesity, maternal dietary intake during pregnancy, excess gestational weight gain, and infant feeding practices, on the aetiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes risk during childhood and adolescence. Key goals of this review are: (1) to summarise evidence to date on consequences of developmental overnutrition; (2) describe shared and distinct biological pathways that may link developmental overnutrition to childhood obesity and youth-onset type 2 diabetes; and (3) to translate current knowledge into clinical and public health strategies that not only target primary prevention in youth, but also encourage primordial prevention during the perinatal period, with the aim of breaking the intergenerational cycle of obesity and diabetes.

KEYWORDS:

Developmental programming; Lifecourse development; Obesity; Overnutrition; Review; Type 1 diabetes; Type 2 diabetes

PMID:
31451868
DOI:
10.1007/s00125-019-4914-1

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