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Biomolecules. 2019 Aug 23;9(9). pii: E406. doi: 10.3390/biom9090406.

Creatine for the Treatment of Depression.

Author information

1
Diagnostic Neuroimaging, Department of Psychiatry, University of Utah, 383 Colorow Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA. brent.kious@hsc.utah.edu.
2
Diagnostic Neuroimaging, Department of Psychiatry, University of Utah, 383 Colorow Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA.
3
George E. Wahlen Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 500 Foothill Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84148, USA.

Abstract

Depressed mood, which can occur in the context of major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and other conditions, represents a serious threat to public health and wellness. Conventional treatments are not effective for a significant proportion of patients and interventions that are often beneficial for treatment-refractory depression are not widely available. There is, therefore, an immense need to identify novel antidepressant strategies, particularly strategies that target physiological pathways that are distinct from those addressed by conventional treatments. There is growing evidence from human neuroimaging, genetics, epidemiology, and animal studies that disruptions in brain energy production, storage, and utilization are implicated in the development and maintenance of depression. Creatine, a widely available nutritional supplement, has the potential to improve these disruptions in some patients, and early clinical trials indicate that it may have efficacy as an antidepressant agent.

KEYWORDS:

bipolar disorder; creatine; major depressive disorder; phosphocreatine

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